SOUTH ASIAN ALLIANCE OF GRASSROOTS NGO’S for child’s right
June 1, 2012 : Nepal: Schools go Online

Nepal: Schools go Online

Six public schools situated at remote parts of the Nawalparasi district have started wireless internet service from this academic session.

The internet services came into operation with the support from Chaudhari Group, said the coordination committee.

The services have been installed at the schools of Bunglingtar and Arkhala Village Development Committee as per a study carried out by Mahabir Pun, winner of the Magasasey award.

Devchuli Lower Secondary School Buglingtar VDCs’, Tribhuvan Higher Secondary School and Arkhala VDCs’ Gorakhkali Lower Secondary School, Setinag Secondary School and Tinkanya Primary School have been facilitated with internet connection through a telephone tower that lies at Devchuli hill.

These schools have also been provided with one set computer with internet connect facility. The school had collected about Rs. 100,000 from the locals and students. Earlier, the area students were forced to go to the district headquarters to learn computer education after the completion of their SLC education.

Kosh Raj Paudel of Bunglingtar stated that information technology did assist in the development of the knowledge, which was possible because of Chaudhari group’s generosity.

The villager have been facilitated with micro hydropower project for a long period and with the power at their disposal every time, they can avail themselves of computers and laptops facilities in their own village.

Padam Raj Giri, formal chairman of the VDC, has now planned to buy computers so that he could chat with his daughters who were in out side of village with the help of internet connection.

In Solukhumbu, responsibility to look after young siblings has barred the children of Chheskam VDC from getting enrolment at schools.

The young kids of the VDC are compelled to stay at their houses looking after younger brothers and sisters.

Many children of around six seven years of age belonging to Sherpa community have to look after younger brothers and sisters after their parents give birth to children.

Mina Fulung, 7 of Chheskam said along with caring her little brother, she had to carry out households works such as fetching of water, cooking, collecting fire woods and other.

The children never get chance to enroll them at schools because their guardians and parents are not aware of the importance of education.

Sangita B.K, another young girl at Chheskam, said she had two bothers and sisters and had to look after them because if she did not do that, her parents would beat her severely. Instead of going to school, she had to look after young siblings, she added.

She said that she could attend the school after her mother gave birth to her brother. B.K said adding that if the parents would stop producing more children now, then she might go to the school.

The villagers are still in dark about the family planning methods.

Reference : Gorkhapata